E-mail: nursing2017@scientificfuture.com | USA : +1-646-828-7579, UK : +44-203-695-1242 | April 05-07, 2017, Barcelona, Spain  

SCIENTIFIC PROGRAM

Nursing Management

Session Introduction

Dale Mueller
California State University, USA
Title: Can leadership skills be practised in an online course? A case study

Biography: Dale Mueller, EdD, MSN, MS, RN, Dale is an Associate Professor in the School of Nursing, Department of Health, Human Services and Nursing at California State University Dominguez Hills. Her interests include global health, community health, and nursing leadership in the health care policy arena. She is a current and 4th time appointee to the California Mental Health Planning Council, the oversight body for the State of California’s master plan for public mental health services. Dale served as Task Force Chair to generate recommendations regarding mental health services for veterans and continues to participate in workforce planning at the state level.

Abstract: Aim of the study/ Purpose: Case study illustration of how leadership skills can be introduced and practised in an online (virtual) classroom. Course is BSN450: Leadership and Management in Nursing. Research questions or hypothesis, and a clear statement of goal of project should be described: This presentation is a case study illustrating how curricular elements of an upper division management and leadership course can foster leadership skills in an RN completion program. Learning objectives and course design will be shared, as well as rationale for selection of multiple activities and various assessments designed to appeal to preferred learning styles for adult learners. Introduction in brief: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (2008) published by the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) provides expectations of baccalaureate programs such that graduates are prepared for practice in today’s complex health care environment. Essential II (Basic Organizational and Systems Leadership for Quality Care and Patient Safety) addresses knowledge and skills in leadership. Clinical immersion courses are one way to ensure that students gain hands-on experiences, but often organizational policies limiting non-employee leadership endeavours, licensure constraints regarding delegation and supervision, or availability of qualified preceptors can present barriers that challenge an optimal field experience. Offering leadership experiences as part of an online course provides another approach to development of knowledge and skills in a more controlled environment. American Association of Colleges of Nursing (2008).The essentials of baccalaureate education for professional nursing practice. Washington, DC: Author. Procedures/ Methods: Case study. References to Quality Matters© design standards for online courses will be included. Results: Comments from students will be included. Conclusion: Discussion about AACN Essentials and how online (virtual) classrooms can offer viable learning experiences through course design elements will be offered.


Kathleen J. Jackson
Rutgers, School of Nursing-Camden, USA
Title: Understanding patient perceptions of health and healthcare in a vulnerable urban patient population

Biography: Kathleen J. Jackson MA, DNP, APRN, BC-ADM, Clinical Assistant Professor, Rutgers School of Nursing-Camden and Family Nurse Practitioner (PI). I have expertise and experience in working with vulnerable communities. I have a broad background in primary care, previously working with the Camden Coalition of Health Care Providers (CCHP) in Camden, NJ, I have gained expertise in community engagement strategies. A recently published book chapter “Jerome-D’Emilia, B. & Jackson, K.J. (2016) Patient-engaged and Community Participatory Research in Bloch, J., Clark, M, & Courtney, M. (eds.), Practice-Based Clinical Inquiry in Nursing: Looking Beyond Traditional Methods for PhD and DNP Research. Springer Publishing Company, LLC. highlights my experience and qualifications for this project. This community engagement work and qualitative research was funded the “Take Care of Health” grant awarded me by the American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

Abstract: After engaging with a vulnerable population residing in several urban housing communities around health and wellness-related activities over the last 7 years, the researchers identified that residents and community staff often spoke of barriers to health and healthcare. Throughout this period, communities described difficulties that deterred health and healthcare such as access to, and cost of healthy food to promote healthy eating, barriers to getting needed healthcare including transportation issues, and feeling disrespected by healthcare organizations or providers. Hearing the residents and stakeholders stories motivated the researchers to enact a more systematic collection of data – to ask the residents and stakeholders in a series of focus groups and individual interviews about their perceptions of health and healthcare for themselves, their families, and their communities. Seven focus groups and three interviews (a total of 37 participants) between May and September, 2015 provided formal opportunities for residents and stakeholders (social coordinators, staff at the communities as well as nurses from the local schools) to articulate their perceptions and beliefs about health, healthcare, and encountered healthcare barriers and potential strategies to overcome them. This project engaged these vulnerable communities and associated stakeholders in exploring perceptions of health and healthcare and identifying potential strategies for reducing barriers to essential healthcare services and optimal health. Qualitative descriptive design using narrative inquiry approach obtained data from community dwellers and associated neighborhood stakeholders. A purposeful sample from the two low income housing communities in Camden, NJ included seven focus groups and three individual interviews conducted over a five- month period for a total of 37 participants. Transcribed audiotapes were analyzed based on interview guides. Themes derived from the participants’ stories of their lives and behaviors in relation to health and healthcare were formed. These themes will be discussed and reveal information that can aid in formulating policy to promote health and improve healthcare for vulnerable urban populations.


Bonnie Raingruber
California State University, USA
Title: Perspectives of Nursing Authors Regarding Open Access Publication

Biography: Dr. Raingruber is a Professor of Nursing at California State University, Sacramento and a Nurse Research at the University of California Davis Medical Center. She has authored two books on clinical reasoning and health promotion, 6 book chapters, 36 peer reviewed traditional journal publications, and 2 predatory open access journal articles. She is an active participant on retention, tenure, and promotion committees that are tasked with developing policies about open access publication.

Abstract: Very little has been published on the advantages and limitations of open access publishing from the perspective of nurse authors. Shen and Bjork (1) looked at the increase in predatory journals and surveyed multidisciplinary authors to determine average article processing charges and times associated with publication. An editorial by Umlauf (2) described practices used by some predatory open access journals. A second editorial described why open access publishing is becoming more common (3) given that subscription and pay-per-view charges are increasing in traditional journals. Crowe and Carlyle (4) examined open access nursing journals and rated the quality of publications based on impact factors and disclosure statements. No one has used a qualitative approach to survey nursing authors who have published in predatory open access journals. A Survey Monkey questionnaire was sent to nursing authors who had published in predatory open access journals to identify the advantages and limitations of those publishing options. Qualitative responses and demographic information was collected. Authors described that advantages of open access publishing included rapid review and the prestige of being asked to submit an article. Disadvantages included article processing / publication charges and not being included in abstracting / indexing databases. Additional research is needed given the rapid increase in open access publication and the confusion between hybrid, open access, delayed open-access, predatory, and traditional options. New faculty members need education regarding predatory open access publishing. Retention, tenure, and promotion committees need to develop and circulate clear open access policies so that faculty members are prepared for the number of new publishing options that now exist.


Julius M. Kitutu
University of Pittsburgh, USA
Title: Undergraduate research mentorship: Preparing tomorrow’s nurse researchers

Biography: Assistant Professor and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Alumni Relations at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. Received PhD in Education, and MEd, both from the University of Pittsburgh, and MSc. from Nagpur University. Project Director to an Undergraduate Research Mentorship Program (URMP). Published and co-authored papers addressing diverse topics: adolescents, mentorship, communication ability among non-surviving ventilated ICU patients, arthritis and rheumatism, and statistical modeling, among others. Oversees marketing, student recruitment, application/admission, enrollment, academic progression and graduation. Teaches graduate students in areas of research computing. My research interests include studying the nursing workforce and transitions to work.

Abstract: Background: According to the 2013 Gallup Poll nurses are voted as the most trustworthy healthcare providers. On average, nurses spent more than 30% of their work time with patients positioning them in an ideal role to inform health policies related to direct patient care. Early educational research skills, integrated with hands on experience as well as participation in mentored projects can help mold and prepare future nurses to play a significant role in informing healthcare policies and integrating evidence-base practices into health related settings. This undertaking would prepare the nursing researchers, while impacting the scientific health of the public and appreciating the tasks they undertake at the nursing stations. Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to inform healthcare organizations and educational institutions about the significance of the utilization of the Undergraduate Research Mentorship Programs (URMP) to prepare future nurse researchers that can inform changes in healthcare policies and support evidence-base practices. Methods and Results: A cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 70 undergraduate nursing students who participated in the Undergraduate Research Mentorship Program (URMP) were asked to evaluate their experience. Ninety-seven percent of the students reported that they considered to pursue a graduate education; the program offered them opportunity for conference presentations, journal publications, networking with other nurse researchers, and developed leadership skills through this URMP experience. Conclusion: Introducing research at college undergraduate level would enhance development of future nurse researchers, and boost students’ perception of the value of nursing career and how it can inform future practices and healthcare policies.


Reem Nassar AL-Dossary
University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia
Title: Nursing in Saudi Arabia

Biography: Reem AL-Dossary is a Saudi citizen; received her Baccalaureate Degree in Nursing in 2003 from King Faisal University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia. Reem earned her Masters of Health Care Management, from the University of Surrey, United Kingdom in 2008. She received a Graduate Certificate in Nursing Education from George Mason University in 2013. Reem started her career as a teaching assistance in the Nursing College at King Faisal University, Damman. She then was promoted as lecturer at Dammam University, Saudi Arabia and worked there for 9-years. More recently, she has worked as an adjunct faculty at George Mason University. Reem is a member of Sigma Theta Tau International Nursing Honor Society, Virginia League for Nursing, and Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars. She was awarded funding through Sigma Theta Tau International and a dissertation completion grant through George Mason University to support her dissertation. Reem’s research interest developed from her passion for nursing education, and her intention is to empower nurses in Saudi Arabia. Her goal is to influence policy by developing a program of research that will improve the understanding of the impact of residency programs on new graduate nurses’ clinical decision-making and clinical leadership skills in Saudi Arabia. Reem also presented her research in the Twenty-Sixth Annual Conference “Best Practices and Models of Excellence in International Education” of Phi Beta Delta Honor Society at Kansas City, Missouri, USA.

Abstract: The profession of nursing in Saudi Arabia has advanced in many areas such as education, manpower, and practice. Yet, Saudi Arabia is challenged by a nursing shortage as are many other countries. The severe shortage of Saudi nurses is accompanied by high turnover rates. In fact, most of the nurses are expatriates, as nurses come from over 40 different countries, including the United Kingdom, Ireland, and the US (Aboul-Enein 2002; AL-Dossary et al., 2012; Aldossary et al., 2008, Almalki et al., 2011). According to the Ministry of Health (MOH) (2008) statistics, the total number of nurses in all Saudi health care sectors is approximately 101, 298; however, Saudi nurses comprise only 29.1% of the total nursing workforce. This number increased from 9% in 1996 to 21.5% in 2002 and 29.1% in 2008 (Almalki et al., 2011). Although these numbers show the growth of the number of Saudi nurses in the recent years, it still is not enough to meet Saudi Arabia’s actual demand.


Daniela T. DeFrino
University of Illinois, USA
Title: Relational Work and Stress: Impact on Patient Safety

Biography: Dr. DeFrino is Assistant Professor of Research in the Department of Pediatrics in the College of Medicine and Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Women, Children and Family Health Science in the College of Nursing at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She has served as Project Director for a large scale adolescent depression prevention trial funded by NIMH. Dr. DeFrino is also an established expert in qualitative research and has published manuscripts in peer reviewed journals. Her areas of research include an empirical grounded theory of the relational work of nurses, grounded theory research of adolescent focus groups to explore coping and disclosure of sadness in teens, implementation of mental health trial in primary care, and relational work of nurses and doctors. Dr. DeFrino has also held an Adjunct Instructor position at DePaul University in Chicago teaching Health Communication. Her overarching interest is the work environment of nurses and doctors in hospitals and how this relational work process can impact nurse outcomes of moral distress and burnout as well as impact patient outcomes.

Abstract: Human factors in interdisciplinary work environments are major contributors to ensuring a safe patient environment. In fact the Institute of Medicine reported that 44,000–98,000 patients die each year in hospitals due to preventable medical errors, costing up to $29 billion. We hypothesized that workplace stress is a major contributor to adverse events and that higher levels of relational work reduces stress and improves patient outcomes, thus reducing cost to the healthcare system. We conducted a mixed methods study focusing on human factors and their impact on patient safety, conducted at two large teaching hospitals in the Midwestern United States. A quantitative review of self-reported adverse events between 2012 -2015 suggests that behavioral issues are major contributors (58%) to adverse event reports and that these issues were largely centered around nurses and physicians. Using the Copenhagen Stress Questionnaire we are currently evaluating the level of work place stress in the NICU. We developed a Theory of Relational Work of Nurses, derived from qualitative data of a grounded theory study (N= 23 face to face interviews with Registered Nurses) which explains and predicts the behavior of nurses with other nurses and with physicians. Taken together, our findings suggest that behavioral issues and the relational work of nurses and physicians contribute to safety of work environments.


Aarti Raghavan
University of Illinois, USA
Title: Relational Work and Stress: Impact on Patient Safety

Biography: Dr. Raghavan is a Neonatologist certified by the American Board of Pediatrics in Neonatal Perinatal Medicine and General Pediatrics. In addition to her role as Fellowship Director for Neonatology at University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago (UIC), she also serves as the Medical Director for the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and the Director for Quality and Safety for the Department of Pediatrics at UIC. Dr. Raghavan is an established expert in the field of patient safety and quality improvement. Her research focusses on workplace stress and its effects on patient safety as well as profiling of neonates at risk for adverse events. Dr. Raghavan has published original research, book chapters and reviews in this field. She is also an active reviewer of original research for international journals and has been an invited speaker internationally. She is an active member of the advisory board for the Illinois State Perinatal Quality Collaborative and also serves on numerous hospital committees.

Abstract: Human factors in interdisciplinary work environments are major contributors to ensuring a safe patient environment. In fact the Institute of Medicine reported that 44,000–98,000 patients die each year in hospitals due to preventable medical errors, costing up to $29 billion. We hypothesized that workplace stress is a major contributor to adverse events and that higher levels of relational work reduces stress and improves patient outcomes, thus reducing cost to the healthcare system. We conducted a mixed methods study focusing on human factors and their impact on patient safety, conducted at two large teaching hospitals in the Midwestern United States. A quantitative review of self-reported adverse events between 2012 -2015 suggests that behavioral issues are major contributors (58%) to adverse event reports and that these issues were largely centered around nurses and physicians. Using the Copenhagen Stress Questionnaire we are currently evaluating the level of work place stress in the NICU. We developed a Theory of Relational Work of Nurses, derived from qualitative data of a grounded theory study (N= 23 face to face interviews with Registered Nurses) which explains and predicts the behavior of nurses with other nurses and with physicians. Taken together, our findings suggest that behavioral issues and the relational work of nurses and physicians contribute to safety of work environments.


Margarett Alexandre
City University of New York, USA
Title: Transcultural Service Learning in Post Earthquake Haiti: Lessons Learned, Opportunities and Future Plans

Biography: Assistant Professor at CUNY York College and doctoral candidate at the CUNY Graduate Center. Holding a Bachelor’s in Nursing and a Master’s in administration from Adelphi University. She served on the CUNY Chancellor’s Haiti Initiative; as leader for numerous missions to Haiti, focusing on educational partnerships. She was awarded a grant from the former CUNY University Dean of Health and Human Services, to support a Visiting Professorship in January and June of 2015. Her research focuses on the health of Haitian Adults post 2010 earthquake. Other research interest include nursing students as millennial learners and innovative pedagogical approaches to teaching.

Abstract: Background: Haiti remains the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere. After the earthquake of January 12, 2010, Haiti is in even greater need of healthcare support. In an effort to provide our students with an opportunity to provide much needed healthcare services to two underserved areas in rural Haiti; an elective course was developed incorporating our Student Learning Outcomes; which included the need to advocate for health policies that address local and global health issues, effectively communicate with diverse client populations and disciplines using a variety of strategies and respecting client's cultural beliefs and practices. This three credit Transcultural service learning elective course offered unique opportunities for students to engage, seek knowledge of the country of travel, interact with the underserved community and identify their unique health needs. Methods: The course was offered over a two-week period during the summer. Senior and junior level nursing students were selected. Prior to travel the students had to research Haiti’s history, culture, and healthcare, social and economic issues as well as immersion in the Kreyol language. Course preparation involved: review of syllabus, completion of assigned readings as well as attending scheduled seminars and an eight hour orientation before travel. While in Haiti Pre and post-conferences and lectures were held to assist the students to reflect, synthesize, and apply global health care needs and assessed information. They also developed individualized plans to address these assed health problems as part of this course. Emphasis was placed on communication, critical thinking, client education, life-span issues, cultural considerations and evidence-based clinical guidelines in nursing practice. Results: Students and faculty have had opportunities to provide care, educate, and disseminate their lessons learned nationally and internationally. Conclusions: This project provided real world learning opportunities for our students while also providing an opportunity to immerse with the community and culture. At the end of the course students and faculty reflected on their global experiences and completed group presentations, wrote papers which compared and contrast healthcare equity, disease burden, social economic and culture. While some noted the language as a barrier; they felt that the experience was life-changing. Finally a debriefing session was held to give students and opportunity to reflect as a group as well as brainstorm on their next steps for sustainable educational projects related to chronic diseases.


Merhawi Teklai Awalom
Asmara College of Health Sciences-Eritrea, East Africa
Title: Therapeutic management of common cold in children in a hospital setting in Asmara, Eritrea

Biography: Merhawi A Teklai is associated with Asmara College of Health Sciences. Professionally he is a Pharmacist, he has published two articles in IJCP, 3 articles in a local journal and one is on its verge of publication in BMJ, he has presented more than 8 presentations to members of Eritrean Pharmaceutical Association, and participated in 15 health science scientific seminars.

Abstract: Purpose: To assess how children with common cold were therapeutically managed in the Eritrean health service system and also to explore the Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of the health workers in the hospital regarding common cold. Introduction: Common Cold (frequent illness of infants & children), usually mild and self limiting in nature and it’s up to date medical recommendations are only supportive and symptomatic. Despite these facts, in Eritrea, it is usual to observe its mismanagement with antibiotics and other drugs which are not supported by strong scientific evidence. These collectively results in many adverse drug effects (worse in children), unnecessary financial losses and potential for drug resistance. Proper knowledge and proper therapeutic practice of health professionals in disease management is the key for clinical success and common cold is no exception to this principle. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted using systematic and purposive sampling. Data for evaluating the therapeutic management of common cold was collected from the medical cards of children who were below the age of five. Information regarding the knowledge and practice of the health professionals in the hospital were obtained using questionnaires. Data was analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences. Results: 410 case records were referred in the study. 17.6% of the children with common cold were treated with antibiotics. Whereas, over the counter cough and cold medications were accounted for 27.8%. 87.3% of the professionals thought that treating common cold can shorten its duration. 58.7% of the respondents considered drugs available for symptomatic relief of common cold have sound scientific basis for safety and effectiveness. Conclusion: Children were not treated in accordance to the treatment guidelines and knowledge of the professionals on management of the disease was poor.


Deirdre O’Flaherty
University Frances Payne Bolton, USA
Title: Cultivating Resilience in your healthcare team

Biography: Deirdre O’Flaherty and Mary Joy Garcia-Dia completed their Doctorate in Nursing Practice from Case Western Reserve University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. Both have published and lectured internationally on resilience, empowerment, self-transcendence. Their research study have focused on staff nurses’ engagement in the workplace to improve patient outcomes and improve staff retention. Deirdre and Mary Joy currently hold leadership positions at major healthcare facilities in New York City, Northwell Health and Mount Sinai Health System respectively.

Abstract: Resilience is a concept that has been applied to research and practice in nearly every possible area of life and academia - from science to sociology, psychology, nursing, and medicine to business and ecology. Given the high degree of stress in today’s society, nursing has become a focus for studies and interventions that foster resilience in the workplace. Investigators such as Jackson, Firthko, and Edenborough (2007) and others have taken the approach that resilience can be learned or developed once the characteristics that exemplify resilience are identified. Active participation of nurses through mentorship workshops for critical thinking and building hardiness, aids in the development and strengthening of personal resilience (Jackson et al 2007 and Hart et al (2012). Nursing management can facilitate resilience in the workplace through strategies that create work–life balance, assist in critical reflection to problem solve and build resolutions to help guide in future situations, and use shared governance as a nursing care model (Garcia-Dia & O’Flaherty, 2016). Now more than ever, with recent traumatic events associated with terrorism, nurses are in the forntline taking care of victims of violence and at the same time dealing with their own vulnerability. This proposed presentation will facilitate methods for assessing one’s own resilience and methods to cope positively personally and professionally.


Mary Joy Garcia-Dia
University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, USA
Title: Cultivating Resilience in your healthcare team

Biography: Deirdre O’Flaherty and Mary Joy Garcia-Dia completed their Doctorate in Nursing Practice from Case Western Reserve University Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing. Both have published and lectured internationally on resilience, empowerment, self-transcendence. Their research study have focused on staff nurses’ engagement in the workplace to improve patient outcomes and improve staff retention. Deirdre and Mary Joy currently hold leadership positions at major healthcare facilities in New York City, Northwell Health and Mount Sinai Health System respectively.

Abstract: Resilience is a concept that has been applied to research and practice in nearly every possible area of life and academia - from science to sociology, psychology, nursing, and medicine to business and ecology. Given the high degree of stress in today’s society, nursing has become a focus for studies and interventions that foster resilience in the workplace. Investigators such as Jackson, Firthko, and Edenborough (2007) and others have taken the approach that resilience can be learned or developed once the characteristics that exemplify resilience are identified. Active participation of nurses through mentorship workshops for critical thinking and building hardiness, aids in the development and strengthening of personal resilience (Jackson et al 2007 and Hart et al (2012). Nursing management can facilitate resilience in the workplace through strategies that create work–life balance, assist in critical reflection to problem solve and build resolutions to help guide in future situations, and use shared governance as a nursing care model (Garcia-Dia & O’Flaherty, 2016). Now more than ever, with recent traumatic events associated with terrorism, nurses are in the forntline taking care of victims of violence and at the same time dealing with their own vulnerability. This proposed presentation will facilitate methods for assessing one’s own resilience and methods to cope positively personally and professionally.


Rena Boss-Victoria
Bowie State University, USA
Title: Social Determinants of Healthcare outcomes and Policy Revisited: The Continuing Persistence of Disparities in Communities of Color

Biography: Dr Rena Boss-Victoria is a native Texan and a graduate of University of Texas’ Public Health Program. Prior to moving to Baltimore, MD, she served as tenured Associate Professor/Undergraduate Senior Coordinator for Nursing and Associate Professor /Graduate Program Coordinator for Health Education, in the College of Education at Prairie View A & M University of the Texas A &M University Systems. She is a certified advanced practice nurse, public health practitioner, leader, researcher, mentor, author and respected educator in the fields of public health and nursing. Most recent appointment, Bowie State University Department of Nursing Chair and Associate Professor for undergraduate and graduate nursing programs.

Abstract: Over the last few two decades, a plethora of studies have documented disparities in healthcare outcomes in communities of color. Consequently, a crescendo of knowledge about, symptoms of and potential solutions to close the gaps healthcare outcomes between communities of color as other communities who consistently experience higher healthcare outcomes has exponentially grown. Moreover, efforts of government and private agencies have grown significantly. The enactment of the American Affordable Care Act by the Congress of United States of American and signed in to federal law by President Barack M. Obama represented a very important set of changes in the healthcare delivery system in the U.S. The policy changes mandated by that law are still unfolding to day. Unfortunately, identified gaps that were identified long ago still persist. In fact, in some cases, identified gaps have actually increased. The current paper is focused on an analysis of three major elements regarding healthcare outcomes with the context of social determinants of healthcare and policy outcomes. Those elements are: Activities of Daily Living Deficit (ADLD), Service Expectation Deficit (SED), and Confidence in Service Deficit (CISD).


Barbara Crump
University of Phoenix, USA
Title: Exploring nurses’ perceptions of dignity during end-of-life

Biography: She grew up in a small rural town in Virginia, where education was not a priority, being a high school dropout, teenage mother and during her teenage years, was married and became a victim of intimate partner abuse at a young age. The thought of a career in nursing came later in her life after a second marriage. Her husband Spencer brought out the best in her, through inspiration and empowering her to believe in herself; He inspired her to obtain her GED diploma, after, she got enrolled in college majoring in Nursing. Upon completion of her Bachelor’s Degree, she continued her education and earned a Master’s Degree to become an Advanced Practice Nurse; as of 8/9/2016, she has completed her Ph.D. in Nursing Research. God has been her strength guiding and supporting her throughout her journey, she is in the nursing field for 28 years, enjoying every minute of her career, especially caring for Veterans with cancer and empowering them and their families throughout this difficult process in their lives, she is currently working as a Nurse Practitioner in Oncology, which has been her passion for eleven years. She is also a mentor for teen mothers, nursing students and victims of intimate partner abuse; her purpose is the empowerment of education. She lives in New Jersey and works at the Veteran Administration Healthcare in the Cancer Center; she also works as an Adjunct Professor of Nursing at William Paterson University, which is very empowering. She is also involved in research and publication with her colleague at the VA.

Abstract: The purpose of this qualitative grounded theory study was to understand nurses’ perceptions of care that supports patients’ dignity during hospitalization at the end of life, and to propose a theoretical foundation consistent with these perceptions as a guide to practice. The research involved analyzing perceptions about processes that can explain how nurses perceive care that supports patients’ dignity at the end of life during hospitalization. The aim of the research in this study included a focus on the general problem that patients’ dignity is not always respected by healthcare providers according to the review of the literature and the acknowledgment of the lack of theories related to nurses’ perceptions of care that supports dignity during end-of-life care. A grounded theory design offered a systematic approach to developing a theoretical model from data that takes into consideration the complexities of nurses’ perceptions of care that supports dignity during hospitalization at end of life. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 11 experienced registered oncology female nurses from the northeastern region of the United States. The research involved analysis of the perceptions of nurses caring for cancer patients admitted to the hospital during end of life. The development of a beginning model for dignity care stemmed from the emergence of three major categories, which were communication, support, and facilitation. The identified subcategories were education, workshops, course curriculum, in-services, being an advocate, listening, being present, physical needs, emotional support, compassion, honoring wishes, respect, and being treated as human. The emergence and development of a dignity model may offer a process that can serve as a valuable reference in providing care that supports the dignity of patients during hospitalization at end of life.


Nemeh Ahmad Al-Akour
Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan
Title: Quality of Life among Hospital Nurses in the North of Jordan and its Associated Factors

Biography:

Abstract: Background: Awareness of the importance of quality of life is increasingly being recognized as an important outcome measure among nurses. Objective: To describe quality of life among Jordanian hospital nurses. Methods: The Short Form health survey (SF-36) was designed to assess health- related quality of life among 331 hospital nurses (160 males and 171 females). The SF-36 is composed of 36 items compromising eight health profiles, cover physical components and mental components. Scores for all profiles are expressed on a scale ranged between 0-100, where higher scores indicate more positive health and better quality of life.The Institutional Review Board was obtained from the Jordan University of Science and Technology Research committee. Data Analysis Descriptive statistics including percentages, frequencies, means, and standard deviations for each study variable were used. Multivariate analysis was performed to test the association of socio-demographic characteristics with study variables. Findings: The mean (SD) of SF-36 total score was 44.6 (SD = 26.4).Male nurses had better quality of life than female nurses in physical function, bodily pain, general health, and social functioning. Nurses alternating shifts had better quality of life in bodily pain than nurses only day shift. Nurses with health problems had lower score in role physical, bodily pain, general health, and role emotional than nurses without health problems. Conclusions and Implications: The quality of life of Jordanian hospital nurses was low. Female gender, having health problems, and alternate shift were associated with lower quality of life of Jordanian nurses. Identifying factors affecting quality of life in clinical setting could increase the awareness of policymakers in management program and could be resulted in increase quality of the work environment, quality of care and improve nurses' quality of life.


Nesrin N. Abu Baker
University – Jordan University of Science and Technology, Jordan
Title: Mothers’ knowledge and practices of managing minor illnesses of children under five years

Biography: Nesrin N. Abu-Baker is a chairperson and an Associate Professor in the Department of Community & Mental Health Nursing at Jordan University of Science and Technology. She teaches graduate and undergraduate courses at the Faculty of Nursing and has supervised many master theses. She was a faculty member and a program coordinator in Fatima College, Abu Dhabi, UAE. She received her BSN from Jordan University of Science and Technology, and her MSN and PhD from University of Cincinnati, USA. She has publications relating to public health and women’s health in international journals and she has attended many international workshops and conferences.

Abstract: The healthy future of a society depends on the health of children, who are guardians of that future (WHO 2005). Reduction of the mortality rate in children under the age of five is one of the eight Millennium Developmental Goals of the World Health Organization (WHO 2011). Assessing mothers’ knowledge and practices in managing minor illness is very important in order to ensure safe and effective ways of managing minor illnesses and decrease complications and hospitalisation. The aims of this study were to explore mothers’ knowledge and practices of managing minor illnesses of children under the age of five and the association between socio-demographic variables of the mothers and their knowledge and practices of managing minor illnesses. This study used a cross-sectional survey design. The survey included true or false knowledge questions related to management of minor illness and related symptoms in children including fever (12 questions), upper respiratory tract infection (seven questions) and diarrhoea (nine questions). Data were analysed by calculating frequencies, distribution, and where appropriate running bivariate correlations and t-tests to determine if significant associations existed between maternal demographic variables and level of knowledge. Findings: A total of 348 mothers who visited the comprehensive health centres in Irbid, Jordan agreed to participatein the study. The mean number of questions answered correctly about fever management was 8.6 (SD¼1.7). The mean score for management of URTI was 4.9 (SD¼1.4) and for diarrhoea was 6.4 (SD¼1.2). There was a significant positive association between the mother’s age, household income, mother’s level of education, and number of children, with knowledge and practices of fever and/or upper respiratory tract infection, p<.05. Therefore, healthcare providers need to play a major role in increasing accurate and comprehensive caregiver's knowledge and practice to reduce suffering of children with minor illnesses and their families.


Ebru OZEN BEKAR
Duzce University, Turkey
Title: Evaluatıon of the control system for nursıng servıces ın terms of the manager and the employee: A qualıtatıve study

Biography: Ebru ÖZEN BEKAR has completed his Ph.D in Nursing Management at Istanbul University. She works as an Asistant Professor at Duzce University Faculty of Health Science. Her interests include management process, nursing leadership, patient and employee safety.

Abstract: Aim: The aim of this study was to discover the perspectives of the nurses and nurse managers for control process of nursing services. Background: Control, that is the last one of five basic functions of management process, is considered as the determinant of organizational success. Therefore; data regarding the evaluatıon of the perspectives of nurses and nurse managers for control process are valuable. Methods: The study was carried out in three different hospitals with 30 managers and 30 nurses by a qualitative design. Perspectives of the nurses and nurse managers were examined separately by face-to-face interview method; and data obtained were assessed by thematic analysis. Results: At the end of thematic analysis of the interviews, four themes were generated including the aim of control system, benefits of control system, problems experienced during control process and the state of being affected by the control process by addressing the perspectives of nurses and nurse managers. Interview data were evaluated so as to reveal differences for managers and employees within the scope of these themes and subthemes. Conclusions: In conclusion; some differences were found in the perspectives of nurses and nurse managers; and it was determined that both managers and nurses experienced problems during the process. Moreover, it was also observed that it remained insufficient to create positive effects such as motivating the employees and empowering the relationships between the individuals in the hospitals using a classical control approach. Implications for nursing management: Introduction of the experiences of nurses and nurse managers during control process plays a significant role in the correct structuring of management process in the hospitals.


Noureddine Elkhoudri
University Hassan first Settat-Morocco, Morocco
Title: Self-reported postpartum morbidity: Prevalence and determinants among women in Marrakesh, Morocco

Biography: Elkhoudri Noureddine has completed his PhD from Cadi Ayyad University, valedictorian, and he is Assistant Professor at Higher Institute of Health Sciences University Hassan first Settat-Morocco. Healthcare professional has worked in several hospitals (mother-child hospital, University Hospital...) For more than 16 years He has published more than 8 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of some journals.

Abstract: Maternal mortality is a public health problem particularly in developing countries. This is mainly related to maternal morbidity, especially during the post-partum period (Haemorrhage, infections…). In Morocco, little is known about maternal morbidity within the population. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of self-reported postpartum morbidity and grasp its determinants. This descriptive and analytic cross-sectional survey was carried out in six health centers drawn randomly in Marrakesh, Morocco. A total of 1,029 women of reproductive age (15–49) giving birth in the year preceding the survey were enrolled. Women were examined in these health centers during the study period. A questionnaire gathered information about socio-demographic, health and reported postpartum morbidity. Bivariate and multiple analyses were used to identify associated factors with the self-reported postpartum morbidity. Statistical significance was set at p < 0.05. Self-reported postpartum morbidity prevalence was 13.1 % while haemorrhage, pregnancy-induced hypertension and fever were the main complications: 71.92 %; 12.18 % and 10.64 % respectively. According to the multiple logistic regression model, the illiteracy among women and the number of pregnancies greater than 3 determine independently this morbidity (OR = 1.24; CI 95 %: 1.09–1.54; and OR = 1.69; CI 95 %:1.04–2.70 respectively). Reducing female illiteracy and fertility will help the fight against postpartum maternal morbidity, which is critical to the wellbeing of women and their infants.


Mu’taman Jarrar
University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia
Title: The Impact of Staffing Level and Patient-Centeredness on the Outcomes of Care

Biography: Mu'taman Jarrar is an Assistant Professor in the College of Medicine at University of Dammam, Eastern Provenance, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. He is a registered nurse with a PhD in Healthcare Quality Management. Dr. Jarrar is a Quality and Patient Safety Consultant at King Fahad Hospital of the University. Dr. Jarrar has published several articles in the field of quality and patient safety. He has 6 years teaching and curriculum development and 3 years leadership experience.

Abstract: Cost containment in healthcare had negative consequences on the quality of care and patient safety. Improving the quality of care and reducing the cost without inducing harm for hospitalized patients is very challenging. Thus, there is a universal need for a cost effective model for improving the quality of care and patient safety. Staff had high adherence to the treatment guidelines, leading to lower cost of health service delivered. This paper introduced the concept of “patient centered care”, which in turn helps to decrease the tension between cutting cost and the quality of care. The suggestion is based on the research where the data was collected in 2015. A total of 652 nurses working in the medical and surgical wards in Malaysian hospitals provide input to the study. Suggestions on the function of patient centered care in addressing tension are provided and discussed in this paper.


Azizollah Arbabisarjou
Zahedan University of Medical Sciences and Health Services, Iran
Title: Patients' Awareness of Their Rights in Educational Hospitals

Biography:

Abstract: Introduction: one of the most important factors affecting the increased satisfaction of patients in the hospital can be a healthy communication network between the hospital employees and the patient. The creation of such a communication network requires awareness of parties of their rights. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the patients' awareness of their rights in educational hospitals affiliated to the Zahedan university of Medical Sciences, Iran. Methods: This research is descriptive study conducted on 156 patients in educational hospitals in 2006. Random sampling was used to determine the sample of study. Data were collected using a two-part questionnaire. The first part of related to demographic characteristics and the second part of the questionnaire related to patient's awareness of their rights. After collecting data, they were analyzed using SPSS 19 software, Pearson correlation and t-test. Results: The results showed that the mean age of people is 37.95 ± 14.80. Seventy and three patients were male, while 97 patients had a history of hospitalization in the same hospital. The relationship between age and total score of awareness of patients' rights was significant, but the relationship between gender and history of hospitalization and total mean score of awareness of patients' rights was not significant. The total mean score of patients’ awareness of their rights was 33.73 ± 8.17 that was at the weak level. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that awareness of patients is at low level and considerable percent of patients had low awareness.


Zaid Al-HAmdan
Jordan University, Jordan
Title: Experiencing transformation: The case of Jordanian nurse immigrating to the UK

Biography:

Abstract: Aim: This study aim to explore how Jordanian nurses experienced transition from home to host country in order to shed light on the elements of transformation. Background: Much research has been conducted on topics such as the current international nursing shortages and recruitment of nurses from various countries. International nurses have unique needs in adapting to a new host culture and workplace and the literature revealed little evidence of nurses’ professional and personal, experiences related migration. Design: A qualitative study was conducted, using individual interviews for data collection Methods: Twenty five face to face and telephone interviews with Jordanian migrant nurses Result: The study shows that living and working in the host country change personal, social and professional attributes for migrant nurses. When nurses migrate, they run into opportunities and significant challenges in their profession and life. While Jordanian nurses contributed their knowledge and skills to the United Kingdom (UK) health care system, they encountered enormous demands of professional transmutation. Discrepancies of work settings between source and host country appear to be a major element behind the required nursing profession alteration. Nurses’ lives are transformed in terms of their personal and the social network in the host country. Conclusion: Social transformation is an integral and inseparable part of engagement with the professional organisation(s) in the host community. Professional integration appears to have far reaching impact and consequences involving not only the individual, but also their home and host country family and professional networks. Relevance to practice: Provide high quality of nursing care need to learn about the transformation experience because we need to expand our sense of who we are and gain a degree of control over how we can carry out our nursing role when we move anywhere in this world and away from our home What does this paper contribute to the wider global clinical community? • Migrant nurses’ experiences portray differences in the work setting between the present and former environment • Professional transformation is the outcome of integration into a new work place and is promoted by differences in policies and regulations of nursing practice between the source and host country • Migrant nurses experienced a professional transformation because the education and work policies in the UK adopt evidence-based practice


Basil Hameed Amarneh
Jordan University, Jordan
Title: Social support behaviors and work stressors among nurses: A comparative study between teaching & non-teaching hospitals

Biography:

Abstract: Abstract: Purpose: The concept of "work stressors" has been well studied. However, in the field of nursing, studies concerning social support behaviors are limited. The aim of this study was to compare nurses’ work stressors, social support behaviors and predictors of these variables among nurses in Jordanian teaching and non-teaching hospitals. Design: a convenience sampling technique and a comparative quantitative research design was used in the current study. Two hundred and ninety-one nurses were recruited from five teaching hospitals and 172 from eight non-teaching hospitals in Jordan. Methods: The Nursing Stress Scale (NSS) and the Inventory of Social Supportive Behaviors (ISSB) were used to collect data. Results: The studied variables differed across hospitals. In some subscales, as well as in some individual items of the scales, nurses' work stressors and social support behaviors differed between teaching and non-teaching hospitals. In teaching hospitals, work shift was the only predictor of nurses’ work stressors, whereas work shift and model of nursing care were predictors of social support behaviors. In non-teaching hospitals, work shift, level of education and model of nursing care were predictors of nurses’ work stressors. Predictors of social support behaviors were marital status, model of nursing and organizational structure. Conclusions: Regardless of the type of hospital, nurses’ stressors should be assessed and, once identified, managed by providing various social support behaviors. Clinical relevance: By turning work environment into a healthy workplace, researchers and nurse leaders believe that improvements can be realized in recruitment and patient safety and quality.


Nursing-2017 | by: Scientific Future Group